Archive for the Bettas category

10 Tips For A Successful Betta Splendens Reproduction

10 Tips For A Successful Betta Splendens Reproduction

By Laurentiu Craciunas

Betta splendens is one of the most wanted fish in everyone’s aquarium. Breeding Bettas is not hard, though you might face problems at spawning them. They are oviparous fish, the male builds a nest in which the eggs/fry are kept for few days under the strict care of the Betta male. If you follow the next advices, you have big chances to get nice results of your Betta fish spawning.

1. Reproduction tank equipment: volume of 15-20 liters, a heater, a thermometer and air pomp connected to an air rock which will spread small bubbles. You need small bubbles because the fry are very sensitive to water movements and you don’t want them to suffer.

2. The aquarium water must have a temperature of 28-29° C, a higher temperature will hurry the eggs hatching and the fry won’t be fully developed. Keep the temperature constant using the heater and check it with the thermometer to make sure it is at the right level.

3. The water depth mustn’t excel 10-15 cm because the Betta eggs are denser than water and they fall down from the nest. The male picks them up in its mouth and brings them back in the bubble nest, but a water column over 15 cm will tire it after few repetitions.

4. Cover the reproduction aquarium with a lid in order to keep the same temperature for the air inside the aquarium. The fry develop their labyrinth after about 30 days and they are very sensitive to temperature changes. The lid also protects against air flow which could ruin the bubble nest.

5. Select a compatible pair of Bettas. At first attempts you’ll only want to get some fry and you won’t be interested in colors/fins, but after some successful spawns you’ll be more pretentious. So you’ll chose same colored Bettas or even more, you’ll look for developing some nice fins (double tails, crown tails, half moons, etc) but this is another discussion…

6. Introduce the male in the evening and only next morning introduce the female, considering that the male has already built the bubble nest. During the night keep the female in a jar near the aquarium and assure some light in order to make eye contact between the male and female; this will stimulate the bubble nest building.

7. The next day, after introducing the female, the Betta male will brutally chase her. That’s why you have to put some plants in the corners of the aquarium in order to assure hiding places for the female. Also make sure you add some floating plants in order to help the bubble nest building.

8. After the first successful egg evacuation, the male (sometimes the female too) will take them (in the mouth) from the bottom of the aquarium and bring up in the bubble nest. You don’t have to panic because this is a natural thing, so don’t take the fish out thinking they eat their eggs 😉

9. A good pair of Bettas can spawn up to 400-500 eggs, after which the female has to be taken out from the aquarium because the male will brutalize her in order to protect the nest. Put the female, for a few hours, in a jar with water where you added some metilen blue in order to prevent eventually infections caused by the wounds.

10. After about 48 hours the fry will hatch and the Betta male will assure they stay together in the bubble nest. After another 2-3 days the fry will swim free. Now it’s time to take out the male and start feeding them with Paramecium and/or Artemia salina (Baby Brine Shrimp).

This is it 😉 10 tips for a successful Betta splendens reproduction. You can find advanced information on specialized websites, books, etc, but following this article should familiarize you with the Betta splendens reproduction needs.

Laurentiu Craciunas has been breeding Betta splendens for over 5-6 years now and he wants to share his experience with others too. You can read more aquaria related articles on his website: Tropical Aquarium Fish

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Laurentiu_Craciunas

Betta splendens Fish aka Siamese Fighting Fish aka

800px-betta_cambodian.jpg

“Memnon” a cambodian coloured male Betta owned by the author. Image By User:Pharaoh Hound.

Source: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Betta fish)

The Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) is one of the most popular species of freshwater aquarium fish. It is a member of the gourami family (family Osphronemidae) of order Perciformes, but was formerly classified among the Anabantidae. It is native to the Mekong basin in Southeast Asia.

The natural colouration of B. splendens is a dull green and brown, and the fins of wild specimens are relatively short; brilliantly-coloured and longer-finned varieties have, however, been developed by breeders (see Appearance, below.)

As B. splendens is the Betta species most commonly known to aquarium hobbyists, it is often but imprecisely sold as, and referred to, simply as “betta” (as a common name), particularly in the United States. The name “betta” can, however, also refer to any of the nearly fifty other members of the genus, including the type species, the spotted betta (B. picta). The fish is known as pla-kad in its native Thailand.

Betta Fish in the Aquarium

Betta Fish in the Aquarium

By Magne Bjorklund

Betta fish are also known as the Siamese fighting fish or Betta Splendens. The fish actually originated in Cambodia, Thailand and will only grow to about three inches or seven centimeters. These are great pets to have for younger children or just as a first pet. They are not too peculiar about anything, and are not that much upkeep, but most fish aren’t. A good healthy betta will live about two to three years.

However, like most fish, they can get many bacterial infections or funguses growing on them. If you would like a tank of betta fish, you will need to know that males cannot be kept in the same tank. They are extremely jealous and are prone to fight because betta fish are very territorial.

Bettas are semi-aggressive fish so it’s best that you keep them in a tank with appropriate species as well. If you want to mix betta fish will other fish, you should know that betta fish are top dwellers so you will want to mix them with middle and bottom dwellers to give your tank fuller look. Depending on the amount of fish, you will need at least a three-gallon tank for betta fish. However, the more you add to the tank, you will need more water space.

Bettas are very colorful and their fins are very long flowing. Bettas are actually one of the most well-known aquarium fish and range in colors. You will find many betta fish with blues, purples, reds, and even white. To tell the different between the two sexes, you will want to pay close attention to the length of the fins and the colors of the fish. Females are dull and not very colorful and have shorter fins. You will also notice that a healthy female betta will display some horizontal stripes.

Bettas are a freshwater fish, which means you will want to fill the tank with some filtered tap water. In nature, you would find betta fish in rice paddies and shallow ponds or maybe even a slow moving stream. They are use to not having the depth of water, but they key to betta fish knows that they are tropical. In their native lands, the water could often get as high as 85F. Bettas need heat to survive and cannot be in water that is below 75*F. The reason why betta fish are not recommended to be kept in a small bowl is because it’s harder to control the temperature. Small fish bowls heat up quickly, but they lose their heat just as fast. In addition, they need a lot of surface space of the tank because they have special organs that allow them to breath directly from the surface and cannot take in oxygen from the water.

About the author:
Magne Bjorklund: http://www.betta-fish.org/
Please also visit: http://www.smoky-mountain-cabin-rentals.info/ http://www.your-pellet-stove.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Magne_Bjorklund

Aquarium Supplies Part 1 — My First Experience With Bettas

Aquarium Supplies Part 1 — My First Experience With Bettas

By Jonathan Wangsa

Keeping fish as pets takes more than just feeding them and changing the water every once in a while. Sadly, many people aren’t aware of that and they just buy aquarium fish because they’re attractive. After a short while the fish start to get sick and die one after the other, and the newbie would lose interest in the hobby and give it up all together.

Basic knowledge of fish keeping, together with the right aquarium supplies, is crucial to the livelihood and longevity of your fish. It’s important to maintain the optimum living conditions for your fish and other living things you may have in your aquarium if you are to enjoy them for a long time.

To illustrate this, I shall share with you my own experiences when I got started with this hobby for the very first time as a child. The first experience was with bettas and the second with goldfish; two different kinds of fish with different requirements.

My first pet fish were a pair of bettas (a male and a female) which my mom bought me because she knew that I liked fish and felt sorry for me because a toy fish was all I had.

We put the bettas in a small plastic jar with a floating live plant. The male was aggressive. He continuously chased after the female and attacked her until she was full of bruises. One night, running out of place to hide, the female desperately jumped out of the water onto the floor. Fortunately I was nearby and was able to save her.

My mom then suggested that we separate the fish. So we put the female in a different jar. However, I felt that the female was lonely. So one day I asked my mom if I could buy another fish. There was a beautiful green male betta that I decided to buy.

At that time I didn’t know that bettas were fighting fish and that the males would fight with each other. So at first I decided to put the new male in the same container as the first male. I knew the first male was aggressive and I just wondered how he would react toward another male.

To my amazement the two males fought with each other and there was no sign that they would stop. After a while I got worried. I didn’t want any of them to die so I finally separated them and put the new male together with the female, and to my pleasant surprise they got along pretty well.

However, that little jar was kind of small for a pair of fish although they got along. So, we decided to move the fish to a much larger plastic container. Later I added a couple more females so that it became sort of a betta community tank.

Being fascinated by the beauty of the male bettas, I bought a couple more and put each in individual jars. I fed them dried food and occasionally bread. However, I fed them too much. The water would become cloudy fast from fish waste and uneaten food. So, I completely changed the water every other day. I would fill up the jar with new water right from the tap.

As you might guess, the fish didn’t last very long. After only a few months they started to get sick and eventually one after the other died.

Dirty water, untreated new water, fluctuating water temperatures, and trauma from being moved frequently during water changes were some of the factors that contributed to the fish’s low resistance to diseases.

Although it’s acceptable to keep bettas in relatively small containers without aeration, it would be much better to put them in a tank of at least 2 gallons, and you would still need to observe certain basic things such as not feeding them too much and setting aside new water to equilibrate the temperature and remove chorine prior to water changes.

I was only about 10 years old at the time and didn’t know anything about fish keeping. Neither did my mom. Also, back then there were very few books about aquarium fish and the aquarium supplies were not as sophisticated as they are today.

Today, there are plenty of good books and magazines as well as web sites about fish aquariums. So, if you’re serious about taking up this hobby, you should start by reading a few of them and gain the basic knowledge before you even buy your aquarium and fish.

In the next article you will learn what happened when I tried to keep some goldfish, also with very little knowledge. In the mean time I invite you to visit my web site (see below) to learn more about aquarium fish keeping.

About the author:

Jonathan Wangsa is the webmaster of All About Aquarium Supplies. There you can find resources and information about aquarium supplies and other aquarium related topics. Whether you’re an expert or a newbie, you can also share your own experiences.

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